Recommended

Adewale Akinnoye Agbaje‘s directorial debut, Farming opens in Nigerian cinemas this weekend (October 25). Ahead of its release, industry’s Crème de la Crème were treated to a night of paparazzi and a rare opportunity to breathe the same air as the Hollywood star.

The movie is beautiful and detailed in its delivery of strong themes of tremendous social relevance. If properly introduced, the Nigerian audience will fall in love with the grass to grace story of Enitan. However, its message stands the chance of getting lost in Farming’s heavily (British) accented dialogue.

In all sincerity, I am a little sceptical about this movie’s reception seeing as it doesn’t fall into the Action, Superhero or Comedy genres. I worry it might be too sophisticated for the average local cinema goer. The language, pace and subject matter pose a marketing challenge. Except Filmone Distribution company is currently working on releasing a subtitled version and creating a strategy that sells the movie as a family flick, it’s likely going to be another IJGB (I Just Got Back) project making its shy way through the cinemas.

Farming is an eye-opening film perfect for families with teenage children in spite of how strongly it depicts violence and other social vices.

Brace yourselves, it’s going to hurt like an unexpected slap

Adewale’s spine-chilling biography is the movie’s focus. The lead character is Enitan (Adewale’s middle name), one of the kids farmed to British families between the 60s and 80s. Farming is served hot with issues of Racism and identity crisis at its forefront.

Enitan’s long road to self-discovery is filled with very painful experiences. As a child, he struggles to feel a sense of belonging. The rejection from his foster mother, Ingrid (Kate Beckinsale) and the seeming rejection from his biological parents coupled with a traumatic childhood experience drive him to the brink of insanity.

As a misunderstood teenage, Enitan continues to struggle with Identity crisis. Another chilling encounter with Tillbury Skins, an infamous gang known for violence, theft and racist attacks turns Enitan’s life around. He soon turns to the gang hoping to find acceptance. He is once again sorely disappointed. At his wit’s end, Enitan is handed a second chance.

Farming opens in Nigerian and American cinemas on the 25th of October. It stars Genevieve Nnaji, Adewale Akinnuoye Agbaje (Writer and Director), Damson Idris, Kate Beckinsale and Zephan Hanson Amissah.

Mamazeus

Mamazeus

If you are reading this, I’m super glad and excited to welcome you to my world. There are two things I simply can’t do without; writing and watching movies. Movie reviewing for me is an opportunity to do both. I simply watch movies and let my readers see these movies through my objective lens.

View all posts

Add comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

About Mamazeus

Mamazeus

Mamazeus

If you are reading this, I’m super glad and excited to welcome you to my world. There are two things I simply can’t do without; writing and watching movies. Movie reviewing for me is an opportunity to do both. I simply watch movies and let my readers see these movies through my objective lens.